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Suddi ‘303’ Raval’s Classic House Top 10

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In the late 80s and early 90s, Suddi Raval was half of Together, the group who played a fundamental part in bringing the sounds of UK rave into the pop charts with their all time classic Hardcore Uproar. Hardcore Uproar is one of those records that is never going to sound dated. From the crazy, pompous Star Wars intro to the wild cheering, to the euphoric Italian piano line, it’s pure adrenalin rush music. These days Suddi – whose day job is making music for computer games, including the Lego franchise- has started producing dance tunes again, making deep house under the name of Nightgeist, and turning out a few deeper acid bangers that have been heard blowing up at the I Love Acid night. He also curates the Classical Uproar, a unique evening of house music reinterpreted in classical style with a 25 piece orchestra and Live Guests, Alison Limerick, Luke Neptune and Bekka Nightgeist on Friday 25th August 2017 at The Church and Friary of St Francis (Gorton Monastery Manchester), Gorton Lane, Manchester, M12 5WF. Here he recalls his favourite house music moments…

1. ‘What Time Is Love’ – The KLF
A record that’s very special to me as it was played at most of the alternative Northern Acid House institutions such as The Blackburn Raves, The Thunderdome, Bugsies where DJ Sasha honed his craft and in the legendary clubs where DJs such as Steve Williams and Jay Williams broke onto the scene. Not quite an Acid House record as it doesn’t contain any obvious 303 sounds but one of the original and powerful records of its time. It was only a matter of time before it broke onto the mainstream charts and when it did The KLF seemed to dominate the UK music industry.

2. ‘Airport ’89’ – Wood Allen (Not “Woody Allen” as it’s often called!)
With its huge blasting synths, boxing bells, distorted organs, crazy chants and driving bassline this is a record which caused eruptions on the dance floor whenever it is played. Every play was met with such frantic dancing, it built up to an energy very few records can compete with.

3. ‘Rock The House’ – by Nicole
Produced by Steve Silk Hurley of Jack Your Body fame it’s the chopped up vocals, manic congas and simple bassline that powered this record and sometimes had the power to cause people to spontaneously perform cartwheels on the dance floor! Nicole performs a vocal on this classic House record that has been sampled to death but never tires.

4. ‘LFO’ – LFO
Tested heavily at the Warehouse nightclub in Leeds before it saw an eventual release on Warp Records, this Techno masterpiece was fundamental to the development of the early UK House scene. It’s sub bass affected and influenced a number of sub-genres at a time when House music fragmented into the Balearic and Hardcore scenes. Loved by DJs and clubbers on both sides, it has passed the test of time and sounds as fresh today as it did back in 1990.

5. ‘Chime’ – Orbital
By two of the forefathers of the UK House scene, the debut single by the Hartnoll brothers was both original and melodic. It is partly due to its incredible simplicity what makes this record such a standout.

6. ‘Wildtimes’ Derrick May MayDay mix – De-lite
Derrick May, one of the fathers of Techno did such a profoundly epic job of remixing this track, it’s virtually unrecognisable until the very end. He created hugely powerful and futuristic techno soundscapes that were destined to be played at huge venues such as the Warehouse parties or the Hacienda nightclub. The throbbing pulsating bassline seemed to swell up and down cavernous spaces consuming anyone caught in its path.

7. ‘Dirty Cash’ – Stevie V
There aren’t any bad mixes of this – it’s such a good record – but it’s the Dime and Dollar mix that really matters on this track. A light hearted acid bassline trickling throughout the track carries the bulk of the record but it’s those infectious vocal melodies that really make this tune what it is. Made at a time when House and rap collided, whilst it is not really a Hip-house record it ticked all the boxes and was a massive smash at the all the big Northern raves.

8. ‘Pacific State’ – 808 State
Written by Mancunian Acid House royalty 808 State, this monumental record caused a seismic shift in the scene on its release. It proved that Acid House can be sophisticated whilst still maintaining its roots in the underground and have a certain jazz edge with the classic saxophone line performed live by Graham Massey.

9. ‘Voodoo Ray’ – A Guy Called Gerald
Written at a time when House music was dominated by the distinctive squelch of the TB-303, this Acid House classic took things a step further by adding a sense of mystery and most importantly those haunting vocals. The stories surrounding why some of the samples are cut short on this track are now a part of dance music folklore but the final resulting sound was no compromise on the dancefloors of the Acid House clubs where it was played.

10. ‘Future FJP’ – Liason D
A record of epic proportions, it begins as it means to go on. Boasting an introduction that very few records can compare to. Its clicky synths and unusual arrangement caused quite a stir whenever it was it played in 1990. It made the incredibly unusual move for House music to start playing its drum section without the bass drum and this just added to its originality and in turn, the effect it had on the dancefloor was greatly magnified.

Suddi ‘303’ Raval curates Classical Uproar, a unique evening of house music reinterpreted in classical style with a 25 piece orchestra and Live Guests, Alison Limerick, Luke Neptune and Bekka Nightgeist on Friday 25th August 2017 at The Church and Friary of St Francis (Gorton Monastery Manchester), Gorton Lane, Manchester, M12 5WF. Conducted by Simon Robertshaw (BBC Philharmonic Orchestra), the event will also feature DJ sets from Phil Rose (Jaegerossa/Northern Edits), Mark XTC and Richard Moonboots & Jason Boardman (Aficionado Records).

To buy tickets for this event please visit the events page: Classical Uproar tickets from Skiddle.

Gig, Club and Festival tickets by Skiddle

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