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De Sluwe Vos – Lost Bank Cards & Frank Rijkaard’s

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OG-Anthem-EP-200x200.jpgLabel: AlbionScore: 8/10 

Vinyl-only British label Albion won a host of plaudits recently thanks to their stunning inagrual release, with Fabio Monesi’s Tape Decks & Dole Cheques an EP that put both the label and the man behind the music on the proverbial house music map. Here, they build on their auspicious start with some conviction, as they rein in fledgling Dutch producer De Sluwe Vos aka Robert Vosmeijer, as he pays homage to his dreadlocked compatriot on the quite brilliant Bank Cards & Frank Rijkaard’s.

First up on the EP is ”OG Anthem”, a track that – as you’d expect ‘ helps showcase the producer’s hip-hop side. With a firm attitude at its core and a flurry of keenly-placed samples, it swaggers with the sort of dancefloor edge that’d appeal DJs of the DJ Sneak/Loco Dice persuasion. The kick-drums play a prominent role, but it’s the party-starting vocal and the eventual drop for which it’s best notable.

US producer and Vanguard Sounds owner Amir Alexander then crops up on remix duties, as he turns the track on its head thanks to a more subtle, slow-burning workout. The flickering keys are an example of the many intricacies on show, but otherwise, it’s the steely, re-worked bassline that’s the cause of much of the atmosphere.

De Sluwe Vos”, complete with its swirling synths. ‘gangsta’ vocal and bongo-laced percussion emphasises De Sluwe Vos’s penchant for a groove, before ”VLCTY” harks back to old-school Strictly Rhythm fare thanks to its high-pitched vocal sample and its relentless drum work. This is house music of the highest fare that appeals to lovers of hip-house in particular. 

 

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Grahame Farmer

Grahame Farmer’s love affair with electronic music goes back to the mid-90s when he first began to venture into the UK’s beloved rave culture, finding himself interlaced with some of the country’s most seminal club spaces. A trip to dance music’s anointed holy ground of Ibiza in 1997 then cemented his sense of purpose and laid the foundations for what was to come over the next few decades of his marriage to the music industry.

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