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Benedict & Palmer Up the tempo on ‘Music Is Not Allowed’

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Singapore’s meta-verse duo Benedict & Palmer drop a 90s indebted bass fused monster, ‘Music Is Not Allowed’, combining electro-fused techno with touches of spaced-out melodies out now on Zoosh33 Music & Metamo Industries.

Hailed as the hottest DJ duo from the Metaverse, Benedict & Palmer’s music crafts a profoundly progressive and euphorically cinematic take on electronica; a combination dubbed by the pair’s trademark, ‘Meta-House’.

Beginning their journey in the wake up of the COVID-19 pandemic, MUSIC IS NOT ALLOWED is a two-track release marking the first chapter of the duo’s sonic documentation of the society-altering experience of life in their hometown of Singapore during its “Circuit Breaker” lockdown and subsequent adaptation to a ‘New Normal’. 

They say: “The title track ‘Music Is Not Allowed’ harkens to the times of forced lockdowns which saw the global nightlife industry extinguished suddenly and completely. A heavy, no-holds-barred techno banger, coupling thumping beats and dark bass tones, topped off with powerful rave stabs. This track seeks to invoke the rage of a planet of free spirits kept from dancefloors, perfectly synergising with the post-pandemic partying renaissance, coined as ‘Revenge Partying’.” 

They go on to add: “For the next track ‘When They Activate The 5G’, it’s a Progressive House tune takes us on an up-and-down journey inspired by conspiracy theories from the deepest internet feverswamps. Kicking things off with smooth octaved undertones, the tune eventually transits into a heavy bass break: the 5G activation, as the world was robbed of in-person human interaction and minds were broken by disinformation.” 

MUSIC IS NOT ALLOWED is available from 16th June on all Major Digital Streaming Platforms, Online Stores, and selected Social Media Platforms.

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Grahame Farmer

Grahame Farmer’s love affair with electronic music goes back to the mid-90s when he first began to venture into the UK’s beloved rave culture, finding himself interlaced with some of the country’s most seminal club spaces. A trip to dance music’s anointed holy ground of Ibiza in 1997 then cemented his sense of purpose and laid the foundations for what was to come over the next few decades of his marriage to the music industry.

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