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Marcus Worgull: Serious Business

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Well to return to London, we met at The Nest – how do you find that compares to other London clubs? That’s a big, bassy soundsystem, isn’t it?

Yes, it is. I was told beforehand that the soundsystem really wasn’t good, by people who have played there before, but I was really impressed as it was really nice and the atmosphere was good. It was good fun to be there with Domenic and Harri and it was a great night for all of us. As always, you try not to expect something because that can kill it if your expectations are too high, but it was a really good night. This Dalston area seems to have really picked up big-time in terms of parties and clubs… I am kind of wandering where the people are moving to now, because they always discover a new area in London for two or three years and then it’s off somewhere else.

Agreed – Dalston and Peckham seem to be the favourite parts of London for club nights these days. But away from London, as you mentioned Domenic Cappello and Harri, can we ask you what it’s like to play Glasgow’s mighty Sub Club?

Oh, I’ve said a couple of times before but it is definitely a ‘church’ [in clubbing terms]. Of course you know all the things about it when you go there, that these guys have been there for 20 years, every Saturday! I don’t know if there is anywhere else were you can get a place like this, where you get these warm-hearted Glasgow people who always treat you very nicely, but are also very honest. I’ve played there a few times and when you’re in the toilet, for example, people will say ‘Oh, tonight you didn’t play that good, not like last time!

 We can only agree, Sub Club is a very special place and Harri & Dom’s Subculture is a big favourite of ours too. But now to more recent things for you, let’s talk about your Vermont project with MCDE, will there be another album from it or will it be a stand-alone project?

Well, we don’t have anything planned at the moment because we’re both busy with other stuff but I don’t imagine that we won’t ever do something again, because it was so easy to do; it was almost a healing experience. But if we did something again then we would need to change the formula. For most of the tracks we needed a maximum of two hours, we just had a great work flow going where we knew what we wanted, we had a melody that would appear during the process, we had something on one of the synths from Danilo [Plessow aka MCDE], then we recorded it while it was running in a loop, one of us said we liked it, we repeated it, we recorded it and then the next synthesizer, then it was done. That’s how it was, with some really rough arrangement, but in the end when we had to finish it in December; we had to do some fine-tuning, like ‘This is bit too long, this is a bit too short…’ and then we were happy that it was done it a hectic way, because for me it was surrounded by gigs, just a few days here and there – and then with getting time with [ Krautrock legend and drummer from Can] Jaki Liebezeit and the other musicians too was quite tough.

Danilo mentioned that there is a studio in Utrecht in the Netherlands that is available that you can rent, which has a lot of different synthesisers, also analogue stuff, so this would be something good. But you always need to find different sounds; to do it all again the same way would be boring for me, we would need to find another approach to make it more interesting. As it is, it’s done and we are amazed by the feedback, it’s totally great, but we don’t just want to repeat it. 

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Well, the reason we’re talking is because of the ONE DAY festival, so we should probably talk about it. It’s all about commemorating the Summer Solstice, i.e the longest day of the year, with you headlining the night’s entertainment, so how do you feel playing at a one-day event or clubs vs festivals in general?

I really can’t say in general because every club, every event is just so different. But in summer if the weather is good outside – with a good soundsystem and a good crowd – it is way more thrilling and can make people way more enthusiastic. You can’t compare it, that’s a special thing. But very often of course the setting is set to be very nice and the soundsystem is set to be really good, but you can be stuck up on some big stage (which I hate) and everyone is watching me… and I think the goal should be to just get lost in music, you know? But very often that doesn’t happen anymore and people are standing there with their fucking mobile phones, taking videos and fucking selfies! Or wanting a photo with you, while you’re playing [laughs]… so it’s no longer about celebrating a moment; it’s about showing your friends on Facebook… this is something that happens much more at festivals.  Because the aim of music, especially the kind of music that we are into, that we produce, or celebrate, is to close your eyes, to lose yourself and forget about what you’ve been doing. It’s just a couple of hours where you can choose to be somewhere else. It’s totally not about pressing the picture button on your fucking mobile phone, which is done far too often. It might sound rude, but I think that the way that you’re not allowed to bring your own drinks to a festival, you should just leave your mobile phone on the counter and get it back later, when you are back in your life.

Agreed, DJs should be alongside the clubbers, not up aloft on a stage so we can ‘worship’ them. 

Exactly! It’s not as if I do anything as I DJ. I can’t  think of anyone else being any more boring than me when I DJ, I’m just concentrating –people think I’m not having a good time, because my face looks so serious, but I’m just concentrating.

So what are you concentrating on now?

New stuff with Peter Pardeike, for Innervisions. We have two tracks now that I’ve been playing for a couple of weeks and they’re cool – they both worked well at The Nest, for example.  They’re not finished yet, so they don’t have titles, plus I have some remixes that I’m working on for the Vermont project. And I have a vocal track I’m working on which I think could be really good… I’m very slow with music; I’m not the kind of guy who can finish a dance track in one or two days. It takes a lot of time for me. 

Marcus Worgull headlines the night line-up of ONE DAY festival, which takes place on Saturday 21 June at The Willows in Hertfordshire. For more information and tickets head to: www.rsn-tickets.com/events/1439/front-to-back-presents-one-day

 

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