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Label: Formula RecordsScore: 7/10

The latest release from Champion’s Formula Records camp –  following on from Hannah Wants and Chris Lorenzo’s superb offering ‘What I Want’ –  comes in the form of Tumble Audio co-founder, Killjoy’s ‘Magnetic EP’, a driving UK Funky, garage infused force of nature.

Having cut his teeth at the later end of the first wave of dubstep, under the pseudonym ‘Ashburner’ -one half of production partnership ‘Goli and Ashburner’ – and later re-inventing himself as new-wave stepper ‘Core’, Killjoy, via the use of his inventive sound palette and ear for sound design, has always strived to be at the cutting edge of whatever scene he has placed himself within.

Re-birthing himself as Killjoy as the sounds of UK Funky started to bubble up from London’s underground, his first couple of releases under his new moniker – which combined early era dubstep’s hefty bass pressure with grime’s abrasive tendencies and Funky’s rhythmic inventiveness – came from his own label, Tumble Audio, the burgeoning Nottingham party starters who in their own words are “committed to putting out dancefloor rinsing tunes and good time vibes.”

The ‘Magnetic EP’ kicks things off with the titular ‘Magnetic’, a dark, rolling number that combines otherworldy, rubbery synth lines, with reverberated FM-style womps and a militant, hip-shaking funky drum track.

‘Higher’ starts off with a repeated refrain  urging the DJ to “take me higher”, before launching into a weighty 8-bar grime meets UK Funky crossover tune, with its robust bass stabs in a constant state of flux, morphing between tones, whilst delicate vocal snippets supplement the pounding groove in a distinctly dubwise fashion.

‘Don’t Wanna’ combines modulated,  chopped up, syncopated, garage inspired vocal snippets with the EP’s most destructive drum track and Killjoy’s ubiquitous urban centric, stacked low end creating a devastating bassline assault on the senses. It’s a clear nod to Killjoy’s ‘northern’ heritage and a refreshing change to the normally London based Funky sound.

All in all, the EP is a refreshing look at the Funky genre from one of the scene, newest, most exciting talents, straddling the boundaries between grime, bassline and house with an assured ease, it is nice to see how Champion is willing to give the more unknown artists a platform from which to broadcast their vivid imaginations.

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Grahame Farmer

Grahame Farmer’s love affair with electronic music goes back to the mid-90s when he first began to venture into the UK’s beloved rave culture, finding himself interlaced with some of the country’s most seminal club spaces. A trip to dance music’s anointed holy ground of Ibiza in 1997 then cemented his sense of purpose and laid the foundations for what was to come over the next few decades of his marriage to the music industry.

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